The 10 Best Sites to Post Your Resume Online

There are a lot of ways to get your resume in front of the right people, and your best chance for success is to do everything you can to get yourself out there. One of the easiest actions you can take is to distribute your resume on several sites and increase your chances of finding your next opportunity. You could be found by your future employer, or even a recruiter could take an interest in your background and then do the work for you.

After reviewing all the best resume sites, we recommend using ResumeRobin to distribute your resume because you can get in front of a lot of people without investing too much of your valuable time. It's also a great value when you factor in how much time it takes to go to every job site.

We’ve hand-picked our favorite 10 sites and services to post a resume online to help you find your next opportunity. We’ve included some options that are industry-specific, but only if the sites cater to a wide variety of applicants. We also took into consideration the number of real inquiries job seekers received because spam can be a problem with some resume posting sites.

The Best Places to Post Your Resume Online

  • ResumeRobin - Massive distribution for just $25. Try it now!
  • Dice - The place to go for tech jobs.
  • Indeed.com - The biggest job search engine.
  • LinkedIn - Make sure your profile matches your resume.
  • ZipRecruiter - A major up-and-comer in job search.
  • CareerBuilder - Highly visited job board with full-time opportunities.
  • Monster - Popular job site with all kinds of jobs, including part-time.
  • Facebook - Leverage your friend network as a professional network.
  • Twitter - Employers will look at your account if you have one.
  • University Career Centers - Leverage your education even more.

ResumeRobin

Distribute your resume to hundreds of sites now!

Compared to the other places to post your resume, ResumeRobin.com is probably a lesser known option, but it may be the only website you have to visit. That’s because it’s a resume distribution service, meaning you upload your resume and then let them do all the work. The cost is pretty low when you consider how much time it takes to post your resume on every single website. You’ll have the option to post within your metro area for $25 (includes up to 150-plus recruiters and job sites), within your state for $55 (includes up to 250-plus recruiters and job sites), or nationwide for $65.

To get started, you just have to upload your resume to the system. From there, ResumeRobin creates an HTML and plain text version. They enter your resume into the daily feed file, which is uploaded to a network of partner websites (including most of the sites mentioned below) via an API and send the resumes to recruiters via email. Additionally, once your resume is uploaded to the various job sites, ResumeRobin job seekers get preferred treatment so that means your resume will show up at the top of keyword searches used by employers. That’s worth the cost alone if you ask us. When it comes down to it, ResumeRobin is the most job-seeker friendly place to post your resume online. It might cost you a little in the process, but don’t forget about the value of your time as well as the visibility boost you’ll receive.

Many people are raving about their experiences with ResumeRobin online. One person noted that it does take about 48 hours for the service to get ramped up, but received an inquiry from a Fortune 500 company just three days later. Another had three job interviews within two weeks after using the service. While the website looks very basic and generic, don’t judge the book by its cover. The company is apparently worth close to $800 million.

Use promo code 'w0kt5' to get $5 off for the Resume Distribution Service.

Dice

Upload your resume to Dice now!

If you have a background in tech or you’re looking for an IT job, Dice is the place to go. It’s probably the biggest specialized job board on the Internet. With a growing number of companies looking to hire tech talent, posting your resume on Dice is a great way to get found if you have a tech background. There are also a good number of contract jobs available on Dice. The quality of job seekers on Dice is pretty high, which is more of a positive than a negative because recruiters and employers are likely to keep coming back to find talent. Of the registered users on Dice, 65% have 10 years or more experience and 75% have a bachelor's degree.

To post your resume, first create a MyDice account. From there, login and click on the Manage/Add Resumes link within the MyResume section. Then, you can upload your resume. The next step would be to make your resume searchable. Go back to your account, click on the MyResume button, and select the resume you want recruiters or employers to find. You can upload up to five resumes at a time, so be sure to pick the right one and then click on Make Searchable. Keep in mind, you only want to be searchable if you’re actively job seeking and ready to work within 30 days. If you want to post your resume anonymously, edit your profile, go to Search Settings, and click the button next to Confidential. Now, your contact info will be hidden.

 

Indeed.com

Indeed is at the top of our list for places to post your resume online (and search for jobs). Indeed.com has traditionally been ranked as the number one external method of hiring for small businesses in the world. In terms of visibility, no other job site gets more action. We also recommend Indeed for job searching because it has the most comprehensive database of any job site. There are more than 200 million people visiting the site every month.

Posting your resume on Indeed.com is pretty simple as well. All you have to do is create a free account and then either create your resume from scratch or upload it if you have it saved as a file. Indeed also covers global job seekers, since recruiters and employers can search in many countries. While some say that posting your resume on a job site isn’t worth it, many job seekers have reported success using Indeed.

LinkedIn

Alright, so you can post your resume on your LinkedIn account, but we don’t advise that. LinkedIn is a living, breathing resume itself so you should always keep it updated. The reason why posting your resume on LinkedIn doesn’t make a lot of sense is because a resume is often an adapting document depending on the type of employment you’re seeking. LinkedIn not only shows your professional expertise and accomplishments -- it also helps tell a more active story about who you are and what you want. Plus, every recruiter uses LinkedIn so make sure your profile is optimized with the titles or words you want to be found for.

Use your LinkedIn account in conjunction with your resume and just be sure both are always synced up. The last thing you need is inconsistencies in your story. Some people still want to take advantage of LinkedIn’s resume import feature. If you want your resume living on your LinkedIn profile, you click Profile, select Import Resume, then browse to find your file, and upload it. Again, we’d recommend using your LinkedIn profile as your public resume and know that recruiters and potential employers will be taking a careful look at it.

ZipRecruiter

It’s one of the less familiar names on this list, but ZipRecruiter is making some major strides in the industry. Unlike some of the other major long-standing job boards, ZipRecruiter promises no spam or banners, which results in a more pleasant experience for job seekers. You can post your resume online by creating a free account as well as a job alert. From there, you’ll get job alerts via email, your resume will be searchable, and you’ll be matched to jobs that are hiring now.

ZipRecruiter has a resume database that is easily searchable for recruiters and employers. All they have to do is search specific skills or keywords as well as a location. Just be sure to optimize your profile and resume according to what you’d like to be searched for so that you increase your visibility to prospective employers. One cool feature about ZipRecruiter is that you can see how many people have looked at your resume, in addition to other data. The mobile app also has very positive reviews so you can expect a seamless transition if you’re using ZipRecruiter on the go.

CareerBuilder

Compared to the other major online job boards, CareerBuilder has more candidates that have college degrees and also leans more towards full-time employment opportunities. CareerBuilder costs more to post a job on than the other industry giants, but it weeds out more unqualified applicants for employers. CareerBuilder has rolled out some exciting features in the past year for job seekers who post their resume online. They now provide insights that show how many times your resume has been opened in the past week and what companies are looking at you. Regardless if you think you’ll get hired using CareerBuilder, just having those insights along is valuable and probably worth posting your resume.

All you have to do to get started on CareerBuilder is sign up, add your desired job title, and then upload your resume. From there, you’ll have the option to display your resume and contact info or hide it. Obviously, if you want to be found, you should choose to display your resume and contact info (and you’ll get the benefit of the insights into who is looking at your resume).

Monster

Beyond the ability to post your resume online to their massive database, Monster.com also has tons of useful career resources. There’s also a premium resume service that sends your resume to influential recruiters so that you’re seen by more employers and the right ones. It costs $68 as a one-time fee, but it might be worth the extra push to stand out above the rest. Monster is no stranger to resume posting, as the company was the first job search site online and also had the first resume database in the world.

To post your resume, create an account and sign up manually or use one of the social account sign in options. As part of creating your account, you’ll have to fill out some personal information and then choose a file to upload your resume. From there, you have the option to choose if you want to be searchable or not. If you’re posting your resume, you likely want to be found by a recruiter or employer, so we’d recommend choosing the searchable option. You can always hide it after if you want to. Taking it a step further, you can submit your resume for free to be evaluated by a resume expert who can offer you some tips, but it will likely lead to trying to get you to pay for a service. Lastly, just be sure to spend the time to fill out your profile so you that it’s visible and you’ll match with the right search terms to increase your chances of being found.

Facebook

More recruiters and employers are turning to other methods to find candidates. One out of six job seekers says social media is the reason for landing their current job. Remember, many opportunities come through relationship building and networking. A lot of that happens on social media. Let’s look at Facebook first and then Twitter next. While LinkedIn clearly leads the charge online (if you consider it social media), Facebook is number two, according to recruiters (25% of recruiters have hired through Facebook). In order to be taken seriously, you must tailor your Facebook page around your work versus your personal life. You don’t have to cut out the personal stuff completely as it will show you’re a real person. Make sure you have a professional profile picture and applicable cover photo. You’ll also want to include all of your work and education information. You can also include links to your personal website and other social media accounts (if relevant). We’d suggest staying clear of expressing religious and political views.

Twitter

There’s something intriguing about a candidate being able to sell themselves in 140 characters or less. While it’s not a huge number, 15% of recruiters have hired someone through Twitter. Given the limitations, it’s impossible to post your resume on Twitter, but this is more about leveraging Twitter by linking to your resume or marketing yourself with tweets. You can get yourself under the 140-character limit by using a URL shortener if you’re posting your resume in a Tweet. Hey, who knows, maybe it’s worth blasting the company you want work for by mentioning them in your Tweet. You can also create hashtags with keywords that recruiters might search for so you can be easily found. Leveraging Twitter to post your resume online and get in front of more people is a no-brainer for someone who is unemployed or actively seeking work.

University Career Center

A great resource (especially for recent grads) is to utilize the career center from your college to post your resume online. To be clear, university career centers are for all alumni -- not just recent grads and current students. Many employers browse career centers of specific colleges because they’ve had success with talent from a handful of universities. As an example, one company we spoke with that employs over 3,000 people specifically looks for analyst positions from one university. It’s hard to imagine other companies don’t do the same thing.

Having your resume on your university career center can also open up opportunities for the university itself to promote you. Several alumni associations have groups on LinkedIn and Facebook. Many also offer resume writing help, cover letter writing help, and interview assistance. At the end of the day, the success rate might still depend on the reputation of your university and the type of employers coming to the university career center website to find candidates. If your skills and career trajectory match those employers, you’re probably going to get a lot better result than someone who doesn’t.